Tuesday, 10 June 2014

Beijing: Be Vigilant against External Forces Interfering China through HK

Beijing: Be vigilant against External Forces Interfering China through HK
Translated by Chen-t'ang 鎮棠, Edited by Chen-t'ang 鎮棠 and Vivian L., Written by The House News
Original: http://thehousenews.com/politics/北京發一國兩制白皮書-稱對港有-全面管治權 

'External forces using HK' - Beijing [RTHK English News, 10 June 2014] 10-06-2014
The State Council has called for vigilance against external forces making use of Hong Kong to intervene in China's internal affairs.In a white paper issued by its information office, it called for the suppression of "the very few people" that collude with outside forces to damage the implementation of One Country, Two Systems in Hong Kong.
It also noted that some deep-seated conflicts were gaining greater prominence, and different sectors should try to resolve them collectively.


The Chinese State Council published a report on "one country, two systems" policy today, saying some people in Hong Kong are "confused and lopsided" in their understanding of the policy and the Basic Law, and have "wrong viewpoints" in the constitutional reform discussion. The White Paper also reinstates that, the actual power Hong Kong has to exercise its High Degree of Autonomy depends on how much power the central government is willing to delegate. It also states that "One Country" and "Two Systems" are not on par with each other, with "One Country" being the prerequisite and "Two Systems" belonging to and deriving from "One Country". In its implementation, the central government has "COMPREHENSIVE JURISDICTION" over Hong Kong, and Hong Kong has authority only on its local affairs.

HK Information Services Department issued a statement in response, saying that "The White Paper is an important document on which every Hong Kong citizen should gain a comprehensive understanding. The Government will facilitate public access to the White Paper through different channels, including uploading the full text of the document to the Government's e-bulletin and the Basic Law websites, and inviting the Central Government officials concerned to conduct briefing sessions with HKSAR Government officials and members of the community respectively." The government will also invite central government officials to explain this document to the Hong Kong officials and general public. Chief Executive CY Leung will hold a press conference this afternoon (10th June) on the matter.

This is the first White Paper issued by the State Council on the practice of one country, two systems. The document reiterates the "it is necessary to stay alert to the attempt of outside forces to use Hong Kong to interfere in China's domestic affairs, and prevent and repel the attempt made by a very small number of people who act in collusion with outside forces to interfere with the implementation of 'one country, two Systems' in Hong Kong".

Regarding political reforms, the White Paper states blatantly that the people who rule Hong Kong must above all "loves the country and Hong Kong", and require the systems of universal suffrage for CE and LegCo elections must "serve the country's sovereignty, security and development interests".

Key quotes from the White Paper on "The Practice of the 'One Country, Two Systems' Policy in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region"
Full text: Traditional Chinese / English (SCMP) / Report: English (Xinhuanet)

The Central government has "comprehensive jurisdiction" over HKSAR
The central government exercises overall jurisdiction over the HKSAR, including the powers directly exercised by the central government, and the powers delegated to the HKSAR by the central government to enable it to exercise a high degree of autonomy in accordance with the law. The central government has the power of oversight over the exercise of a high degree of autonomy in the HKSAR.
 As a unitary state, China's central government has comprehensive jurisdiction over all local administrative regions, including the HKSAR. The high degree of autonomy of HKSAR is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership. The high degree of autonomy of the HKSAR is not full autonomy, nor a decentralized power. It is the power to run local affairs as authorized by the central leadership. The high degree of autonomy of HKSAR is subject to the level of the central leadership's authorization. There is no such thing called "residual power."
"One country" and "two systems" are not on a par with each other
The "one country" is the premise and basis of the "two systems," and the "two systems" is subordinate to and derived from "one country." But the "two systems" under the "one country" are not on a par with each other. The fact that the mainland, the main body of the country, embraces socialism will not change.
* The "one country" means that within the PRC, HKSAR is an inseparable part and a local administrative region directly under China's Central People's Government. As a unitary state, China's central government has comprehensive jurisdiction over all local administrative regions, including the HKSAR. The high degree of autonomy of HKSAR is not an inherent power, but one that comes solely from the authorization by the central leadership. The high degree of autonomy of the HKSAR is not full autonomy, nor a decentralized power. It is the power to run local affairs as authorized by the central leadership. The high degree of autonomy of HKSAR is subject to the level of the central leadership's authorization. There is no such thing called "residual power."
"Wrong views" on one country, two systems and the Basic Law stifle economic and social development
... [T]he practice of "one country, two systems" has come to face new circumstances and new problems. Some people in Hong Kong have yet felt comfortable with the changes. Still some are even confused or lopsided in their understanding of "one country, two systems" and the Basic Law. Many wrong views that are currently rife in Hong Kong concerning its economy, society and development of its political structure are attributable to this.
... Each of these provisions must be understood in the context of the Basic Law and the HKSAR system as a whole. The implementation of the Basic Law shows that if we comprehend individual provisions of the Basic Law in an isolated way without taking into account the Basic Law as a whole, stressing one aspect while ignoring others, ambiguity or even contentious interpretation will occur, which will severely hamper the implementation of the Basic Law.
CE elected by universal suffrage must love China and love Hong Kong
The central government continues its support for the HKSAR in developing a system of democratic governance that suits the actual conditions in Hong Kong in a gradual and orderly manner as provided for in the provisions of the Basic Law. The ultimate aim of selection of the chief executive will be one by universal suffrage upon nomination by a broadly representative nominating committee in accordance with democratic procedures and the election of all the members of the Legislative Council by universal suffrage. This solemn commitment of the central government has been incorporated in the Basic Law and the relevant resolutions by the NPC Standing Committee. The central government is sincerely in favor of moving Hong Kong's democratic governance forward. The system of universal suffrage for selecting the chief executive and forming the Legislative Council must serve the country's sovereignty, security and development interests, tally with Hong Kong's actual conditions, take into consideration the interests of all social strata, give expression to the principle of equal participation, and be conducive to the development of capitalism in Hong Kong. In particular, the systems must conform to HKSAR's legal status as a local administrative region directly under the central government and accord with the Basic Law and relevant resolutions adopted by the NPC Standing Committee. Furthermore, the chief executive to be elected by universal suffrage must be a person who loves the country and Hong Kong. As long as all sectors of the Hong Kong society hold pragmatic discussions and build a consensus based on the above principles, these two ultimate goals are sure to be reached.
Be vigilant against outside forces attempting to disrupt the practice of "one country, two systems"
...[S]tay alert to the attempt of outside forces to use Hong Kong to interfere in China's domestic affairs, and prevent and repel the attempt made by a very small number of people who act in collusion with outside forces to interfere with the implementation of "one country, two systems" in Hong Kong.

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